Are acorns edible?

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Are acorns edible?

Postby coon4492 » Fri Sep 25, 2009 9:36 pm

This seems like one of those questions for google but I get better info here. So are acorns edible? What other things can I use acorns for? Theres millions of acrons around my property and it seems like I could be using them.
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Re: Are acorns edible?

Postby dixieangler » Sun Sep 27, 2009 10:18 am

(Green) Deane Jordan has these links:

Article "Acorns: More Than Survival Food"
http://www.eattheweeds.com/www.EatTheWe ... _Food.html

Acorns video #50
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=28yYMb_RwBo
Last edited by dixieangler on Sun Sep 27, 2009 9:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Are acorns edible?

Postby LDS » Sun Sep 27, 2009 6:49 pm

Indians all over North America prized the acorns of their regions. It is believed that the care of the acorn, hickory, hazelnut and chesnut groves to enhance their productivity, might have been one of the sparks for agriculture in NA.

They gathered them, crushed them into a paste and leeched water through them to remove the tanic acids, and dried them into a flour. the flour was used to thicken soups and make breads.

The Indians used controlled burning to keep the ground clear in the groves so the harvest would be easier. They also spaced the trees for best production in full sunlight. The hunters soon found that these cleared zones were ideal hunting places, with a good bait crop and clear fields of fire.

The wilderness of 1492 looked a lot different than what we call wilderness today. Trees of huge size and little undergrowth or brush. Green canopy that streched from the Atlantic to the Mississippi River, blocking much of the sunlight from the ground. Lots of ferns, moss and lichens growing on downed logs that sometimes took a century to decay. Areas that had a lot of buffalo normally had open pararie with cane or grass, even in the east. Buffalo were hard on the woods.
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Re: Are acorns edible?

Postby coon4492 » Tue Sep 29, 2009 6:28 pm

cool guess Im going to eat some acorns then. Can I use the tannin stuff acorns have for other projects. It was brought up before on the prairie wolf forum but the guy who was supplying the information was unreliable this guy wrote a post about how pot is an amazing miracle healing plant that cured him from the flu lol.
"The diference between danger and food supply is simply the presence of a killing tool."

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Re: Are acorns edible?

Postby dixieangler » Wed Sep 30, 2009 10:57 am

coon4492 wrote:Can I use the tannin stuff acorns have for other projects.


It was in the article I posted above.

If you use the boiling method don't throw away the tannic water. The water has a variety of uses. With a mordant it can be used to dye clothing. The tannic acid also makes a good laundry detergent. Two cups to each load but it will color whites temporarily a slightly tan color. Tannic water is antiviral and antiseptic. It can be used as a wash for skin rashes, skin irritations, burns, cuts, abrasions and poison ivy. While you can pour the tannic water over poison ivy, if you have the luxury freeze the brown water in ice cube trays and use the cubes on the ivy eruption. If you have a sore throat you can even gargled with tannic water or use it as a mild tea for diarrhea and dysentery. Externally dark tannic water can be used on hemorrhoids. Hides soaked in tannic water make better leather clothing. Using the brown water turned hides tan colored and that is why it is called tanning and from there we get the words tannins and tannic.
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Re: Are acorns edible?

Postby coon4492 » Thu Oct 01, 2009 9:08 pm

lol right I have a bad habit of scanning thorugh articles i'm not surprised I missed that bit of info
"The diference between danger and food supply is simply the presence of a killing tool."

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Re: Are acorns edible?

Postby Kortoso » Sat Dec 26, 2009 2:30 pm

I learned at the Tracker School that the oaks with pointy leaves have acorns with higher tannic acid and the ones with more rounded leaves have acorns with lower tannic acid.

Acorns were a staple food in stone-age Europe.
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Re: Are acorns edible?

Postby dixieangler » Sat Dec 26, 2009 10:14 pm

Kortoso wrote:I learned at the Tracker School that the oaks with pointy leaves have acorns with higher tannic acid and the ones with more rounded leaves have acorns with lower tannic acid.


Deane Jordan, Acorns: More Than Survival Food wrote:Oaks fall into two large categories, those that fruit in one season, white oaks, and those that fruit after two seasons, the black oaks and the red oaks. The latter category is far more bitter than the former. The first category have leaves with round lobes and no prickles at the end of the leaves. The black and red oaks have prickles at the end of their leaves. They also have scales on the cups of the acorns and hair inside the caps. Some times those in the first category don't need any leaching, or very little. The rest always do. But first, clean the acorns.


He also said something in his video EatTheWeeds: Episode50: Acorns,
about small size acorn caps (cups) having less tannin while larger acorn caps (cups) having more tannin or something like that.
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