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HomeSurvivalFireFire From Ice

Fire From Ice - Overview

Allan "Bow" Beauchamp

  
I have many levels to "Fire from Ice". This page depicts just one level. The photos on this page give hints of how Fire From Ice may be accomplished. Fire from Ice was a real unique journey to understanding Mother Nature in all seasons.
  

  

This is the smallest ice lens I have ever made. As you can see, it still provides a very nice focussed spot!

  

This pic shows the larger and more unique lens shape. Once one knows the second secret to this technique, your lens style and lens size will vary, as seen in this pic, all the while maintaining the lens focus.

 
As I always say,
I prefer to do my works in the bush.

My fire from ice work has always been this way. Just go in the bush, take out your knife and unaided and unsheltered, find nature's secret of fire in this skill. This hasn't always been easy. As my partner will attest, some times the coal is smoldering and I'd leave it unsheltered, allow it to go out, and then have to start again. He'd ask me, "why don't you just shelter it, and be done?" My answer was this: "I can learn so much more from the fine tuning to do it all natural, than I ever will by doing it once and just making it work."

And soon you'll see why I did it on the trail I had. There was a secret to this journey that I am most grateful for learning!

--Bow

 
This is a small lens with a good focus -- lots of skill to learn this!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This was my best ever ice lens, and the smallest that I could make it and still get a good focus from.

Being this small it melts fast and fine tuning must be exact. But the photo shows that it is a fine collector of the suns rays!
 

 

Text and Photos Copyright by Allan "Bow" Beauchamp